Myths about Diabetes !

There are a lot of myths and misconceptions about diabetes. So how much do you really know about diabetes? Read on to sort out fact from fiction.

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1. You can catch diabetes from someone else. Click me for answer.

A: No. Although we don’t know exactly why some people get diabetes, we know that diabetes is not contagious – it can’t be caught like a cold or flu. There seems to be some genetic link in diabetes, particularly Type 2 diabetes. But environmental factors also play a part.

2. Eating too much sugar causes diabetes. Click me for answer.

A: No. Diabetes is caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. However, being overweight does increase your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, so if you have a history of diabetes in your family, a healthy diet and regular exercise are recommended to control your weight.
 

3. People with diabetes eventually go blind. Click me for answer.

A: Although diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in people of working age , research has proved you can reduce your chances of developing diabetes complications – such as damage to your eyes – if you:

*control your blood pressure and glucose levels
*keep active
*maintain your ideal body weight
*give up smoking.

 

4. People with diabetes should eat special diabetic foods. Click me for answer.

A: The healthy diet for people with diabetes is the same as that recommended for everyone – low in fat, salt and sugar, with meals based on starchy foods like bread and pasta and plenty of fruit and vegetables. Diabetic versions of sugar-containing foods offer no special benefit. They still raise blood glucose levels, are usually more expensive and can also have a laxative effect.
 

5. People with diabetes can't eat sweets or chocolate. Click me for answer.

A: Sweets are no more out of bounds to people with diabetes than they are to the rest of us, if eaten as part of a healthy diet, or combined with exercise. And people who take certain tablets or insulin to treat their diabetes may sometimes need to eat high-sugar foods to prevent their blood glucose levels falling too low.

6. Diabetics are more likely to get colds and other illnesses. Click me  for answer.

A: No. You are no more likely to get a cold or another illness if you’ve got diabetes. However, people with diabetes are advised to get flu jabs. This is because any infection interferes with your blood glucose control, putting you at risk of high blood glucose levels and, for those with Type 1 diabetes, an increased risk of ketoacidosis.

7. Type 2 diabetes is mild diabetes. Click me for answer.

A: No. There is no such thing as mild or borderline diabetes. All diabetes is equally serious, and if not properly controlled can lead to serious complications.

8. It's not safe to drive if you have diabetes. Click me for answer.

A: Providing you are responsible and have good control of your diabetes, research shows that people with diabetes are no less safe on the roads than anyone else. Nevertheless, the myth that people with diabetes are not safe persists.

9. People with diabetes can't play sport. Click me for answer.

A: Tell that to Steve Redgrave, Olympic gold medal-winning rower; Gary Mabbutt, ex-captain of Tottenham Hotspurs; or the many other people with diabetes who take part in the London marathon every year. People with diabetes are encouraged to exercise as part of a healthy lifestyle. Keeping active can help avoid complications associated with diabetes, such as heart disease.

However, if you treat your diabetes with insulin or certain tablets, you should be careful to avoid having a hypo (low blood glucose level) when doing strenuous exercise. You may need to reduce your insulin dose and should carry a high-sugar snack with you in case your blood glucose levels fall too low. It is a good idea to discuss strenuous exercise with your care team before embarking on any new exercise plan.




   


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